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20130216
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
disruption in defense programs and a sharp decline in our military readiness. >> leon panetta is leaving his job as secretary of defense. in an impassioned address this week, secretary panetta warned of the looming budget cuts the pentagon faces due to sequestration. sequestration is washington argot for automatic spending cuts that will slash defense department budget by roughly $42.7 billion this year alone. the cuts are currently scheduled to go into effect on march 1, three weeks away. in his speech, panetta says the pentagon is already preparing itself for the budget axe. one of the most visible signs weeing the reduction from two to one the number of aircraft carriers the u.s. operates in the critical persian gulf. >> this is not a game. this is reality. these steps would seriously damage a fragile american economy, and they would degrade our ability to respond to crisis precisely at a time of rising instability across the globe. >> question. can the pentagon survive budget cuts or are secretary panetta's worries on the mark? mort zuckerman. >> yes, i think they can survive it. they ha
to another topic, and it yielded a surprising set of answers from defense secretary leon panetta, and the joint chiefs chairman, general martin dempsey. arizona republican john mccain asked about a report that president obama rejected a proposal to arm syrian rebels last summer. >> did you support the recommendation by secretary of state... then secretary of state clinton and then head of c.i.a. general petraeus that we provide weapons to the resistance in syria? did you support that? >> we did. >> you did support that. >> we did. >> suarez: so far, the president's judgment has been that things won't get better with american arms. instead, he's warned the weapons might fall into the hands of extremist elements, a concern reiterated today by the new secretary of state, who was asked about the deliberations last year. >> i don't know what the discussions were in the white house and i'm not going backwards. the new administration, we're going forward from this point. there are serious questions about al nusra and a.q.i.-- al qaeda in iraq-- and other violent groups on ground. >> sua
't argue with him. who won't confront him. i think leon panetta's been a pretty good secretary. >> rose: drones. john brennan got into it at his confirmation. some say that this is an unusual situation. that the president has carried forward some of the baigs policies and that he's effectively waged war against terrorism using drones and that he should be commended for it. what say the former vice president? >> well, i like the drone program. when we came in, we had the drones as intelligence platforms but we didn't have any weapons on them. they were unarmed so you could go find a target but then you had to bring in another platform in order to take it out. and it was about the time of 9/11 or shortly before that that we began to arm drones so you could find a target and hit it at the same time. a hellfire missile or a 500 pound bomb. i think it's a good program and i don't disagree with the basic policy that the obama administration has pursued in that regard. i put a caveat on there. i don't think they have the capacity at this point to capture al qaeda individuals and be able to dev
leon panetta and general martin dempsey chair of the joint chiefs said they made that recommendation to president obama. panetta told a senate hearing that, in the end, the president decided against sending in arms. instead, the u.s. has provided only humanitarian aid to the rebels. secretary panetta also defended the military's response to the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. the assault killed ambassador chris stevens and three other americans. panetta testified there'd been no specific warning of an imminent attack, so u.s. forces were too far away to respond. >> the united states military, as i've said, is not and frankly should not be a 911 service capable of arriving on the scene within minutes to every possible contingency around the world. the u.s. military has neither the resources nor the responsibility to have a firehouse next to every u.s. facility in the world. >> sreenivasan: republican senator john mccain of arizona argued the military could have deployed in time, if it had heeded warnings coming from the consulate and ambassador stevens. a 21-year-old
as 800,000 dod civilians around the country for up to 20 days. >> defense secretary leon panetta says that if sequestration kicks in and billions of defense cuts are allowed to stand, he will throw the -- it will for the defense strategy out the window. if congress does not act to stop this, there will be a $1.20 trillion cut in spending, half in the defense department, and no corresponding rise in taxes. what is your best guess, evan? will it happen? >> yeah, a kid is going to happen. >> mark, if it does happen, the consequences? >> carl levin, i respect as much as any member of congress, thinks the odds are about even. the iceberg is at there and we can see it and we continue to sail in the direction of that. i think republicans, particularly speaker boehner, don't want it. >> colby, how did it come to this? >> they kicked it down the road. they tried to put this up to frighten everybody, but they cannot get together on the questions of tax cuts, cutting spending, entitlement reform. we are not going to have a sequestration. we are going to have castration of the military, castratio
forced a vote on breaking the fillibuster. the current defense secretary leon panetta who'd been due to leave his post today has said he will stay on until his successor is confirmed. and, at a ceremony honoring for and late today the president said it was unfortunate to have politics intrude while he's still presiding over a war in afghanistan. to help us understand the implications, the politics and what's next, we turn to pentagon reporter mark thompson of "time" magazine. and todd zwillich of public radio international's "the takeaway." welcome back, gentlemen, todd, begin with you. decode for us what happened today. i mean, the republicans told harry reid they had the votes to block the nomination-- block consideration of the nomination, yet he forced it to a vote in the amp anyway. why? >> he did. well, there are different imperatives floating around all cornerings of this vote, as there often are in the senate. opposition to senator hagel has mounted before he was even named and almost all of that opposition except for token opposition came from within his own party. building
defense secretary leon panetta warned that those countries and the uses will have to contend with, quote, rogue states for some time. >> you just saw what north korea has done in these last few weeks. the missile test and now a nuclear test. they represent a serious threat to the united states of america. we've got to be prepared to deal with that. >> steven: north korea's own public statement insisted today's test was only a first response. it said it will be additional actions to come but gave no specifics. >> brown: and i'm joined by ambassador charles "jack" pritchard, former u.s. special envoy for north korea negotiatons under president george w. bush. and james acton, a senior associate in the nuclear policy program at the carnegie endowment for international peace. ambassador pritchard, i guess one obvious question is why now? >> it's a great question. and i usually start by saying why not now? let me explain that. north koreans have a very mature and serious nuclear weapon and a missile technology program. they're going to continue to do the research and development. when the tim
panetta the out going secretary of defense. they have been two of the most critical of the nominee to be his successor, chuck hagel. it is date night too. i want to point out that. the democratic senator from colorado two years ago proposed, judy, that members instead of just democrats sitting with democrats and republicans... this year i think he's doing it with the republican senator from alaska, that peoplec with people from the other party and across the aisle. several members have done it. i think mccain and gram seem to be a couple of them. >> they share the popcorn. woodruff: that's a tradition they started a few years ago. a a number of members picked it up. it seemed to fade. >> it was done right after the gabrielle giffords. >> woodruff: she's here tonight. i don't think we've seen her in the last few minutes but we saw her just before we went on the air. she's there with her husband mark kelly. she and her husband have become the two, i guess, you could say the most prominent faces of this new push to do something about gun violence. they're working with the mayors again
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)